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Issue #1708      October 28, 2015

Region Briefs

Vietnam’s National Assembly (NA) held its 10th meetings in Hanoi, discussing a new law to supervise activities of the NA with the People’s Councils. Most NA deputies supported the law, as it asked the NA, its Standing Committee and People’s Councils to hold question-and-answer sessions during meetings. Deputies, such as Huynh Nghia, suggested that chief officials should answer questions during the sessions, not by their subordinates. The NA will review the outcomes of the 2011-2015 national development programs and new development programs for the period of 2016-2020. It will also discuss the implementation of 2015 state budget and estimate the budget for 2016.

Parents of students from six public junior high schools in the Japanese province of Shiga were angry about the Self Defence Forces’ (SDF) new recruitment advertisement, as the provincial SDF PR department had donated toilet paper to the schools which were printed with cute characters and QR code saying “SDF personnel wanted: please feel free to inquire”. One parent said children might believe that their schools encouraged them to join the SDF. Local assembly representative, Moriwaki Toru, stated that the schools were irresponsible, as they did not consider the impact of the distribution of the toilet paper. Moreover, the Japanese Education Ministry planned to ban high school students joining in political activities within school clubs, even during after school hours or on holidays. High school students across the country recently participated in an increasing number of political movements, expressing their opposition to the government’s war bills.

China’s top political advisor, Yu Zhengsheng, attended the fifth Congress of Society for Promotion of Guangcai (Glory) Program, meeting with private entrepreneurs who contributed to poverty alleviation. The program was founded in 1994, aiming to alleviate poverty with the help from private business. Yu urged entrepreneurs to take social responsibility that benefit the people, reduce poverty and boost development in rural areas. He also asked all sectors to support and guide the program.

The Communist Party of China (CPC) Central Committee recently published new rules on discipline, aiming to better manage its 88 million members. The new rules include 53 old articles that members were forbidden to do and added eight new articles that emphasise moral ethics building. The rules asked members to strengthen belief in communism and socialism with Chinese characteristics, serving the people wholeheartedly and keeping the Party’s good traditions. The rules state that members should separate private interests from public interest, put the public interest first, uphold simplicity and fight against extravagance. The new rules are also stricter.

Next article – Culture & Life – Hypocrisy riding high

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