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Issue #1726      April 13, 2016

US/Soros plot backfires?

If “Get Putin” really was the agenda behind the data leaks as some believe, then the plan seems to have backfired as it is US ally David Cameron who is currently feeling the most heat from the revelations.

David Cameron with his father: Though he is not named in the reports himself, the British Prime Minister is linked to the so-called “Panama Papers” by his late father Ian Cameron, who died in 2010.

Suspicions that this was a “hit job” on an “official enemy” of the US stem from the timing of the Panama Papers release – just one week after Russia helped the Syrian Army liberate Palmyra from ISIS, thus pushing back US plans for regime change in Syria still further – and that the documents had been shared with two particular organisations, the Organised Crime and Corruption Reporting Project (OCCRP) and the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) which receives funding from George Soros’ Open Society Institutes – and in the case of the former, USAID.

But if we are indeed talking about a US/Soros conspiracy to foment trouble in Russia in a parliamentary election year, then it’s a plan which seems to owe more to Baldrick than Albert Einstein.

While “official enemies” Putin and Assad duly made the headlines on day one of the news leak, the story has now moved on and threatens to jeopardise the careers of individuals Washington surely wouldn’t want to see affected. Furthermore, the leaks also put into the spotlight the turbo-globalist, elite-friendly economic system designed not in Russia, but by self-styled “free marketers” in the US and Britain in the 1970s.

A Pandora’s Box has been opened by the Panama leaks and – ironically given the ICIJ and the OCCRP’s funding – it’s billionaire global capitalists like George Soros who have done very well out of the economic changes of the last 40 years who have most to fear from the populist backlash.

Here’s the rub: Since the late 1970s and the advent of Thatcherism and Reagonomics, we’ve seen a massive transfer of wealth from the majority to the super-rich as elite-friendly neo-liberal policies replaced the more collectivist ones which operated in the 30 or so years following World War II.

In Britain, a report of the OECD in 2011 found the income share of the top one percent more than doubled in the period 1970 to 2005. Last October, Oxfam revealed that half the world’s wealth was in the hands of just one percent of the population.

The Panama leaks, described by whistleblower Edward Snowden as “the biggest leak in the history of data journalism,” show us how the global super-rich exploit the current system still further to keep their wealth away from the taxman – and get even richer at our expense.

And what the revelations make clear is that the super-rich wouldn’t be able to do this without the help of banks, lawyers, accountants and other intermediaries who most clearly do not act in the public interest.

British neo-cons and Sorosian “liberals” who no doubt gloated over the headlines in the US and Britain involving Putin and Assad really don’t have anything to shout about, because while no one named in the leaks comes out smelling of roses, it’s Washington’s most obedient ally – Britain – and its political and financial elites that arguably come out of this scandal worst of all.

The more we read about the leaks, the more we understand the key role of the City of London, British overseas territories and Crown Dependencies in the global tax avoidance system.

After Hong Kong (which don’t forget was a British Dependent Territory until 1997), UK firms figure more than the firms of any other countries in the Panama Papers.

All in all, 1,900 British firms feature, and more than half of the 300,000 firms believed to have used the services of Mossack-Fonesca are registered in British overseas territories or Crown dependencies.

The role of British banks, such as HSBC, Rothschild and Coutts in helping the rich stash their gains away in tax-havens has also been highlighted.

RT

Next article – Panama Papers – Where have all the Americans gone?

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