No: 4


Winter 2003
QUARTERLY  MAGAZINE  OF  THE  COMMUNIST  YOUTH  OF  AUSTRALIA


I just wanna say

The general working conditions at McDonald's are pretty average, but I've never worked anywhere else so I don't have anything to compare it to.

The treatment by managers differs every shift. There is one Manager who owns the store who is one of the rudest men I've ever encountered. He used to call all of the female employees "babe", and he could be really insulting if you made mistakes.

I get one three-hour shift a week if I'm lucky; there have been occasions where I have been without a shift for an entire fortnight. The three-hour shifts are the shortest shifts they can give me and it is very rare that I work over those three hours.

I'm pretty sure I get such short shifts because I am 17 and I still haven't been trained to do everything yet (such as: working when the store opens and closing it up).

The wage is low which means I struggle to pay for petrol every week and after I do pay for my petrol to get to school I don't have enough money for my lunch or anything else I may need.

There is a real emphasis on aesthetic value at McDonald's too. The good looking young people get the better jobs dealing with the customers, they get the best shifts and they are treated better by the managers and the other employees.

It is very rare that someone who doesn't dress or look like everyone else gets hired.

When they hire you they give you booklets to read that have phrases like "welcome to the team" written throughout the pages but after working there for a week I realised that it's not so much a team of equals as it is a class pyramid: the managers and owners are at the top, then there's the crew trainers, then the older employees, then the new employees at the very bottom.

If you don't make yourself seen and appreciated when you're new you don't move up the ranks.

That's probably all I can say before I launch into an angry rant.

Rachelle

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